Transforming Education in Northern Syria

Children in northern Syria have endured some of the most horrific hardship in living memory. During the war, many children missed months, or even years, of schooling. Working with 157 teachers in 84 classrooms, we’ve helped to transform education for 3,351 children in Aleppo and Idlib, in partnership with Unicef.

Before the war, 99% of Syrians had primary education, and 82% had attended lower secondary school. Today, over 2 million Syrian children are out of school.

Our work helping the children of Syria access education

Through leaflet campaigns and visiting vulnerable homes, we promoted education for children who are out of school, or at risk of dropping out. We also educated about the repercussions of early marriage and child labour.

We rehabilitated and repaired 84 classrooms, and equipped 65 of them with furniture, computers and projectors. Around 3,000 children received school textbooks, and psychosocial support, and the children also have access to extra-curricular materials such as sports equipment, playground toys and art supplies.

To ensure good hygiene, we rehabilitated water and sanitation facilities, and installed handwashing points, water tanks and mobility access toilets.

We also supported their teachers – we provided them with learning materials, monthly incentives, and we trained them on psychosocial support, inclusive education, gender-based violence, and education in emergencies.

“Whoever does not show mercy to our young ones, or acknowledge the rights of our elders, is not one of us.” (Ahmad)

You can help inspire the next generation of Syrian children

Our project has transformed education for thousands of children, ensuring that their classrooms are safe and well-equipped, that their teachers are trained, and that they have extra-curricular materials for when they need to take a break.

We’re also working to improve education for 20,000 Syrian refugees in Turkey, find out how you can help us to transform the future of a Syrian child for just £150.

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